le Gallerie


By the 1850s, Rue Laffitte had become the hub of the Parisian art market and would continue to be until World War I. It was a busy commercial area that intersected with Boulevard

22des Italiens. In 1870 Durand-Ruel had moved to a larger gallery that had two entrances, one at 16 Rue Laffitte and the other at 11 Rue Le Peletier; he would remain here until 1920.38 The Paris Opera House was on Rue Le Peletier until it burned down in 1873. There were many upscale shops and expensive private homes in the area, and many art dealers were also located there, particularly on Rue Laffitte.39 Adolphe Beugniet, whose shop had been at 10 Rue Laffitte since 1848, was one of the most prominent in the neighborhood. He represented Eugène Delacroix, the well-established Salon artist, but also specialized in landscape painters. Beugniet had little sympathy for the Realists, although he did work with Degas in 1880. At 12 Rue Laffitte was Alexis Febure, who was the first to buy works by Manet, including Boy with Sword. Alphonse Legrand had a gallery at 22A Rue Laffitte from 1876 to 1878, but had previously worked for Durand-Ruel and rented rooms at this gallery for his own exhibitions. He was bankrolled by Gustave Caillebotte and made several unsuccessful attempts at sending Impressionist paintings to America between 1878 and 1886.40 At No. 33 was Alexis-Eugène Detrimont, who began his career as a framer and restorer and was encouraged by the dealer Febure to open a shop on Rue Laffitte. Like Durand-Ruel, Detrimont had established a reputation for dealing in contemporary landscapes, particularly those of Charles-François Daubigny. He was also Gustave Courbet’s dealer for a time.41

At 52 Rue Laffitte was Père (Pierre-Firmin) Martin, whose family had been dealers since 1869. He went to the artists, bought low, and sold quickly to make a small profit. After 1870, he was a dealer of the Impressionists. In 1870 Pissarro gave Martin’s address as his own in the Salon catalogue. Martin lived a few doors away from Renoir’s apartment at 29 Rue St.-Georges. He sold works by all of the Impressionists at low prices, had a high turnover rate and a keen eye, and recognized young talent early. He frequently resold to Durand-Ruel and often served as a

broker between the artists and the more fashionable dealers. His business ended when, in 1893, he died in his apartment fire.42

At No. 34 Rue LaFayette, at the corner of Rue Laffitte, was the Gallery of Louis Latouche. Latouche was an artist himself and had sent his works to the Salon from 1866 to 1882.

Galleria Durand-Ruel al 16 di Rue Laffitte (1920)
Galleria Durand-Ruel al 16 di Rue Laffitte (1920)
Galleria Georges Petit
Galleria Georges Petit